The Washington Post partners with Twitter, Double Robotics to test robot at 2016 political conventions

Working with Twitter and Double Robotics, The Post’s robot will provide a live stream of delegates and politicians in Cleveland and Philadelphia via Twitter’s app, Periscope, giving users a guided tour of the convention site and letting them ask questions about the convention experience via Periscope chat.

Source: The Washington Post partners with Twitter, Double Robotics to test robot at 2016 political conventions – The Washington Post

44 Percent of Twitter Accounts Have Never Tweeted

According to the site, approximately 44 percent of Twitter’s 947 million accounts or so have never sent a single tweet. Of the number that have — approximately 550 million — just under half of these accounts are reported to have sent their last tweet more than one year ago (43 percent). Only 126 million have sent any kind of tweet at any point in the past 30 days.

via 44 Percent of Twitter Accounts Have Never Tweeted | News & Opinion | PCMag.com.

What Twitter has said, however, is that the service had a count of 241 million average monthly active users as of December 31 last year – a 30 percent increase over the same time period one year prior.

Chris Messina Talks About Inventing The Hashtag On Twitter

On Quora, Messina explained why he chose to let the hashtag become a free device anyone can use and not a licensable product that he could have made money from:

  1. claiming a government-granted monopoly on the use of hashtags would have likely inhibited their adoption, which was the antithesis of what I was hoping for, which was broad-based adoption and support — across networks and mediums.
  2. I had no interest in making money (directly) off hashtags. They are born of the Internet, and should be owned by no one. The value and satisfaction I derive from seeing my funny little hack used as widely as it is today is valuable enough for me to be relieved that I had the foresight not to try to lock down this stupidly simple but effective idea.

via Chris Messina Talks About Inventing The Hashtag On Twitter – Business Insider.

I Flirt and Tweet. Follow Me at #Socialbot.

For some, the goal is increasing popularity. Last month, computer scientists from the Federal University of Ouro Preto in Brazil revealed that Carina Santos, a much-followed journalist on Twitter, was actually not a real person but a bot that they had created. Based on the circulation of her tweets, a commonly used ranking site, Twitalyzer, ranked Ms. Santos as having more online “influence” than Oprah Winfrey.

via I Flirt and Tweet. Follow Me at #Socialbot. – NYTimes.com.

Socialbots are tapping into an ever-expanding universe of social media. Last year, the number of Twitter accounts topped 500 million. Some researchers estimate that only 35 percent of the average Twitter user’s followers are real people. In fact, more than half of Internet traffic already comes from nonhuman sources like bots or other types of algorithms. Within two years, about 10 percent of the activity occurring on social online networks will be masquerading bots, according to technology researchers.

How Twitter Rebuilt Google’s Secret Weapon

Borg is a way of efficiently parceling work across Google’s vast fleet of computer servers, and according to Wilkes, the system is so effective, it has probably saved Google the cost of building an extra data center. Yes, an entire data center. That may seem like something from another world — and in a way, it is — but the new-age hardware and software that Google builds to run its enormous online empire usually trickles down to the rest of the web. And Borg is no exception.

via Return of the Borg: How Twitter Rebuilt Google’s Secret Weapon | Wired Enterprise | Wired.com.

At Twitter, a small team of engineers has built a similar system using a software platform originally developed by researchers at the University of California at Berkeley. Known as Mesos, this software platform is open source — meaning it’s freely available to anyone — and it’s gradually spreading to other operations as well.

Someone could have just made a ton of money hacking the AP’s Twitter account

Algorithmic trading bots react instantaneously to keywords in news reports and even tweets, which is likely why the market fell so quickly. Stocks started to recover about three minutes later but took seven minutes to return to their earlier levels.

via Someone could have just made a ton of money hacking the AP’s Twitter account – Quartz.

Vine’s Great Mobile Design Is All About Its Engineering

Vine sacrifices pixel resolution for speed and gets away with it because the user experience is primarily, well, mobile: you’re more likely to be watching Vine clips in a tiny square on your smartphone, not blown up on a Retina Macbook Pro.

via Vine’s Great Mobile Design Is All About Its Engineering | MIT Technology Review.

Twitter: It’s time for patent trolls to bear the costs of frivolous lawsuits

According to the American Intellectual Property Law Association (AIPLA)’s 2011 survey, an average patent lawsuit costs between $900,000 to $6,000,000 to defend. In the last month and a half alone, Twitter has received three new patent troll lawsuits.

via Twitter: It’s time for patent trolls to bear the costs of frivolous lawsuits — Tech News and Analysis.