Google to Buy Artificial Intelligence Startup DeepMind for $400M

This is in large part an artificial intelligence talent acquisition, and Google CEO Larry Page led the deal himself, sources said. According to online bios, Hassabis in particular is quite a talent, a child prodigy in chess who was later called “probably the best games player in history” by the Mind Sports Olympiad.

via Exclusive: Google to Buy Artificial Intelligence Startup DeepMind for $400M | Re/code.

Google now proxies images sent to Gmail users

It’s simple for senders to do this. Embed in each message a viewable image—or if you’re feeling sneaky, a nearly invisible image—that contains a long, random-looking string in the URL that’s unique to each receiver or e-mail. When Google proxy servers request the image, the sender knows the user or message corresponding to the unique URL is active or has been viewed. In Moore’s tests, the proxy servers requested the image each subsequent time the Gmail message was opened, at least when he cleared the temporary Internet cache of his browser. That behavior could allow marketers—or possibly lawyers, stalkers, or other senders with questionable motives—to glean details many receivers would prefer to keep to themselves. For instance, a sender could track how often or at what times a Gmail user opened a particular message.

via Dear Gmailer: I know what you read last summer (and last night and today) | Ars Technica.

The key to this issue is that Gmail now defaults to images on in email which should always be off.  In order to fix this Google must cache all images upon receipt of every email.  Doing it when a user requests an email defeats the entire purpose.  It’s always good practice to view with images off on all email no matter what the provider claims.

What If IBM’s Watson Dethroned the King of Search?

Google continues to top the search game with the mission of “organiz[ing] the world’s information and mak[ing] it universally accessible and useful.” But now this mission is limited given how rapidly artificial intelligence has pushed the boundaries of what’s possible. It’s raised expectations of what we expect from computers. Even Siri has. In that mindset, Google is basically a gigantic database with rich access and retrieval mechanisms without the ability to create new knowledge.

via Google in Jeopardy: What If IBM’s Watson Dethroned the King of Search? | Wired Opinion | Wired.com.

In other words: Google can retrieve, but Watson can create.

Google wants a patent on splitting the restaurant bill

Google Patent Application, October 2013: “For example, continuing with the example of FIG. 4, assume that Users A-C have drinks at a bar and User B pays a bill of $45 for the drinks. User B adds the payment transaction as an expenditure of the group and allocates $15 of the transaction to User A, $20 to User B, $10 to User C. In this example, the balance module 308 would update the individual balances of Users A-C to indicate that User B now owes $115 to User A ($130-$15) and User C owes $10 to User B ($0+$10).”

via No joke: Google wants a patent on splitting the restaurant bill – GeekWire.

I didn’t think one could patent a mathematical formula.

How Twitter Rebuilt Google’s Secret Weapon

Borg is a way of efficiently parceling work across Google’s vast fleet of computer servers, and according to Wilkes, the system is so effective, it has probably saved Google the cost of building an extra data center. Yes, an entire data center. That may seem like something from another world — and in a way, it is — but the new-age hardware and software that Google builds to run its enormous online empire usually trickles down to the rest of the web. And Borg is no exception.

via Return of the Borg: How Twitter Rebuilt Google’s Secret Weapon | Wired Enterprise | Wired.com.

At Twitter, a small team of engineers has built a similar system using a software platform originally developed by researchers at the University of California at Berkeley. Known as Mesos, this software platform is open source — meaning it’s freely available to anyone — and it’s gradually spreading to other operations as well.

Google BigQuery is now even bigger

BigQuery is a cloud service that lets users analyze terabyte-sized data sets using SQL-like queries. It’s based on Google’s Dremel querying system, which can analyze data where it’s located (i.e., in the Google File System or BigTable) and which Google uses internally to analyze a variety of different data sets.

via Google BigQuery is now even bigger — Tech News and Analysis.