Introduction to Computer Science

This is CS50x, Harvard University’s introduction to the intellectual enterprises of computer science and the art of programming for majors and non-majors alike, with or without prior programming experience. An entry-level course taught by David J. Malan, CS50x teaches students how to think algorithmically and solve problems efficiently. Topics include abstraction, algorithms, data structures, encapsulation, resource management, security, software engineering, and web development. Languages include C, Python

Source: Introduction to Computer Science

Windows 10 Bundles a Password Manager. Password Manager Bundles a Security Flaw

“This potential vulnerability requires a Keeper user to be lured to a malicious website while logged into the browser extension, and then fakes user input by using a ‘clickjacking’ technique to execute privileged code within the browser extension,” said Craig Lurey, co-founder and CTO of Keeper Security.

Source: Windows 10 Bundles a Password Manager. Password Manager Bundles a Security Flaw

The Overwatch Videogame League Aims to Become the New NFL

Every major sport in the US has seen the average age of its viewership increase since 2000. The NBA’s average fan is 42. The average NFL fan is 50. The average MLB fan is 57. What’s more, these audiences are limited almost entirely to North America. The Overwatch League, meanwhile, will begin with nine US teams and three from abroad—Shanghai, Seoul, and London (with more, I’m told, on the way)—and its average fan is a demographically pleasing 21 years old.

Source: The Overwatch Videogame League Aims to Become the New NFL | WIRED

Portugal’s internet shows us a world without net neutrality, and it’s ugly

Portugal isn’t the only country allowing tiering of internet services. In Britain, the internet service provider Vodaphone charges about $33 a month for basic service but offers several “passes” allowing unlimited video or music streaming, social media usage, or chat, at additional tariffs of up to $9.30 per month.

Source: Portugal’s internet shows us a world without net neutrality, and it’s ugly – LA Times

4 Million Bitcoins Gone Forever Study Says

According to new research from Chainalysis, a digital forensics firm that studies the bitcoin blockchain, 3.79 million bitcoins are already gone for good based on a high estimate—and 2.78 million based on a low one. Those numbers imply 17% to 23% of existing bitcoins, which are today worth around $8,500 each, are lost.

Source: Lost Bitcoins: 4 Million Bitcoins Gone Forever Study Says | Fortune

In the future, more bitcoins will be lost. But the rate at which they disappear will be much lower than in the past since, now that they’re so valuable, people will be more vigilant about keeping track of them (unlike this poor fellow out who threw away a hard drive with the key to 7,500 bitcoins).

AT&T and Comcast lawsuit has nullified a city’s broadband competition law

The court agreed with AT&T and Comcast’s argument, saying, “It is clear that the [Metro Nashville] Charter grants NES broad, unencumbered power to manage and control the properties of the Electric Power Board. It expressly denies that power to the Mayor, the Council, and any other agency of the Metro Nashville government.”

Source: AT&T and Comcast lawsuit has nullified a city’s broadband competition law | Ars Technica

​Linux totally dominates supercomputers

In 1993/1994, at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center, Donald Becker and Thomas Sterling designed a Commodity Off The Shelf (COTS) supercomputer: Beowulf. Since they couldn’t afford a traditional supercomputer, they built a cluster computer made up of 16 Intel 486 DX4 processors, which were connected by channel bonded Ethernet. This Beowulf supercomputer was an instant success.

Source: ​Linux totally dominates supercomputers | ZDNet

Linux first appeared on the Top500 in 1998. Before Linux took the lead, Unix was supercomputing’s top operating system. Since 2003, the Top500 was on its way to Linux domination. By 2004, Linux had taken the lead for good.

How AV can open you to attacks that otherwise wouldn’t be possible

The attack worked first by getting Bogner’s malicious file quarantined by the AV program running on the targeted computer. The pentester then exploited vulnerabilities in the AV programs that allowed unprivileged users to restore the quarantined files. He further abused a Windows feature known as NTFS file junction point to force the restore operation to put his malicious file into a privileged directory of Bogner’s choosing. The technique took advantage of another Windows feature known as Dynamic Link Library search order. With that, Bogner’s malware ran with full privileges.

Source: How AV can open you to attacks that otherwise wouldn’t be possible | Ars Technica