Why putting a script in /etc/cron.hourly is not working?

As you’ve probably seen in the comments to your question, the cronjobs in /etc/cron.hourly (and the other, similar directories) are executed by run-parts. run-parts is a little picky about filenames. By default it doesn’t execute files whose filenames contain anything other than (all of those from ASCII)

  • uppercase letters
  • lowercase letters
  • digits
  • underscores
  • dashes (“minus signs”)

So if your script has a filename of for example “myscript.sh”, it just is ignored, because run-parts does not like the dot.

Source: Why putting a script in /etc/cron.hourly is not working? – Ask Ubuntu

LOL!

How to Free up Unused Memory in Ubuntu/Linux Mint

In this tutorial, we will see how to use the terminal to clean up unused memory that was not released properly after being used by your system. No need to use any third-party software, just a few commands will do the job pretty easily.

Source: How to Free up Unused Memory in Ubuntu/Linux Mint

Have a little problem with a server freezing which might be memory related.  This simple tutorial was very helpful.

You can free up unused memory under Ubuntu/Linux Mint using this command:

sudo sysctl -w vm.drop_caches=3

Linux systemd Affected by Memory Corruption Vulnerabilities, No Patches Yet

The bugs exist in ‘journald’ service, tasked with collecting and storing log data, and they can be exploited to obtain root privileges on the target machine or to leak information. No patches exist at the moment.

Source: Linux systemd Affected by Memory Corruption Vulnerabilities, No Patches Yet

Windows Isn’t a Service; It’s an Operating System

An operating system that runs on millions of different hardware configurations is not a service. It can’t be updated as easily, and you’ll run into issues with hardware, drivers, and software when you change things. The upgrade process isn’t instant and transparent—it’s a big download and can take a while to install.

Source: Windows Isn’t a Service; It’s an Operating System

Researcher finds simple way of backdooring Windows PCs and nobody notices for ten months

The technique does not allow a hacker to remotely infect a computer unless that computer has been foolishly left exposed on the Internet without a password.

Source: Researcher finds simple way of backdooring Windows PCs and nobody notices for ten months | ZDNet

Since registry keys are also boot persistent, any modifications made to an account’s RID remain permanent, or until fixed.

Linus Torvalds says Linux kernel v5.0 ‘should be meaningless’

With the removal of old architecture and other bits of tidying up, with v4.17 RC1 there were more lines of code removed than added: something described as “probably a first. Ever. In the history of the universe. Or at least kernel releases.”

Source: Linus Torvalds says Linux kernel v5.0 ‘should be meaningless’

‘Kernel memory leaking’ Intel processor design flaw forces Linux, Windows redesign

A fundamental design flaw in Intel’s processor chips has forced a significant redesign of the Linux and Windows kernels to defang the chip-level security bug.

Source: ‘Kernel memory leaking’ Intel processor design flaw forces Linux, Windows redesign • The Register

There were rumors of a severe hypervisor bug – possibly in Xen – doing the rounds at the end of 2017. It may be that this hardware flaw is that rumored bug: that hypervisors can be attacked via this kernel memory access cockup, and thus need to be patched, forcing a mass restart of guest virtual machines.