IPv4 address stock dwindles as North American database runs dry

The move does not mean that there are no IPv4 addresses left, but that requests will have to be smaller to be accommodated or applicants will have to wait for blocks of address space to be returned.

Source: IPv4 address stock dwindles as North American database runs dry – IT News from V3.co.uk

The dwindling amount of IPv4 addresses means that their worth is increasing, something the UK government is hoping to cash in on by selling off around 17 million unused addresses that could be worth millions of pounds.

IPv6 To Complicate Threat-Intelligence Landscape

Yet with the gradual — some would say “glacial” — move to the Internet Protocol Version 6 (IPv6) address scheme, the Internet’s address space will grow from merely big to nearly infinite. The vastness of the address space will cause problems for many threat-intelligence firms, from allowing attackers to use a new address for every attack to causing a rapid expansion in the size of the database needed to track the data on various sources, says Tommy Stiansen, chief technology officer for Norse, a real-time threat intelligence provider.

via IPv6 To Complicate Threat-Intelligence Landscape — Dark Reading.

BT Retail Tests Controversial Carrier Grade NAT IP Address Sharing

The technique has been criticised because it imposes certain limits on users by virtue of the fact that their broadband connection no longer has the use of a fixed unique IP address, but is rather sharing an address with other users – in BT’s trial, up to nine other users. This means, for instance, that users can’t serve content to the wider Internet from servers on their home network; and BT admits that it can also affect activities such as online gaming and dynamic DNS services.

via BT Retail Tests Controversial Carrier Grade NAT IP Address Sharing.

IPv4 address transfer markets are forming where we least expected

And indeed, in the APNIC region, 191,744 addresses were transferred in 2011 with another 713,216 in the first half of 2012. In the RIPE region Europe, the former Soviet Union, and the Middle East, the researchers couldn’t find any address transfers. But surprisingly, in the ARIN region North America—where there is no immediate shortage—no less than 821,504 addresses were transferred in 2011 with 4.22 million in the first half of 2012.

via IPv4 address transfer markets are forming where we least expected | Ars Technica.

But we now know there are other players than ISPs looking to secure enough IPv4 addresses for the medium term. There’s also the possibility that address trading will take off once trading between regions becomes a possibility, so that address-starved Asians can buy up addresses from North American companies such as HP. That company happens to be sitting on more than 33 million addresses. Or consider the US government, which has more than 168 million. Ultimately, maybe the money is better spent upgrading to IPv6 instead.

Over 3 Million Americans Now on IPv6

In the U.S. the latest numbers for IPv6 are impressive. APNIC’s global survey as of August 1st has IPv6 penetration in the U.S at 1.35 percent. That translates into an estimated IPv6 user base of 3.3 million users, the largest base of IPv6 users in the world.

via Over 3 Million Americans Now on IPv6.

“There are Tier 1 ISPs out there that refuse to go and get either transit or peering with other ISPs,” Nygren said. “So there are places on the IPv6 Internet, in particular in parts of Europe, where there is no path between point A and B.”

60% of ISPs to roll-out IPv6 by end of 2012

The survey revealed major regional differences in IPv6 deployment plans:

  • Every Japanese ISP surveyed has deployed IPv6
  • Only 25% of North American respondents have deployed IPv6, but 100% plan to by year-end
  • Just 48% of European respondents plan to deploy IPv6 by year-end
  • Only 20% of Latin American ISPs plan to deploy IPv6 by year-end.

via 60% of ISPs to roll-out IPv6 by end of 2012.

ISATAP

ISATAP (Intra-Site Automatic Tunnel Addressing Protocol) is an IPv6 transition mechanism meant to transmit IPv6 packets between dual-stack nodes on top of an IPv4 network.

Unlike 6over4 (an older similar protocol using IPv4 multicast), ISATAP uses IPv4 as a virtual nonbroadcast multiple-access network (NBMA) data link layer, so that it does not require the underlying IPv4 network infrastructure to support multicast.

via ISATAP – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.

How ISATAP works

ISATAP defines a method for generating a link-local IPv6 address from an IPv4 address, and a mechanism to perform Neighbor Discovery on top of IPv4.